Weekly Status Report: 2019-12-22

Hello all!

Significant progress has been made towards 1.0: 64-bit time support has landed, and Horizon can join wireless networks, in addition to many more fixes!

Horizon

It is now possible to join Wi-Fi networks using the Horizon Wizard UI.

All labels in the Horizon Wizard UI now utilise automatic word wrapping, so that large font sizes and longer translations are not cut off.

The arch key has been specified and implemented, allowing you to choose the architecture of the target computer. This allows you to write a HorizonScript on one type of computer (e.g. ppc64) and use it to install Adélie on a different type of computer (e.g. armv7).

Packaging

Our time64 conversion has been completed for the System repository on all 32-bit architectures we support. This includes bumping Easy Kernel to 5.4.5 (smaeul@), and fixing issues in the musl libc (awilfox@, dalias) and various packages including CVS, GCC Go, and strace.

Molly Miller (sysvinit@) updated Git for security fixes.

Have a Happy Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Kwanzaa… Whatever you celebrate, have a Happy Holiday and a joyous and prosperous New Year in 2020 and beyond. Be well, everyone.

One thought on “Weekly Status Report: 2019-12-22

  1. GWB January 9, 2020 / 11:49 pm

    Hello, Adelie Linux!

    Just a note of encouragement for your efforts here. Thank you for your work, especially on the ppc64 platform. At the moment, we’re “locked in” to FreeBSD because we need support for ZFS and device drivers like SAS and USB 3.1, but we’ll try adelie at some point on our older Powermac G5 machines. I’m not much of a coder, but I might take a look at your toolchain at that point and see what can be compiled on ppc64. Sorry about the dust up with Gentoo (which we have also used and like), but you seem to be doing well where you are. If it helps any, other distros have had far more angst. NetBSD and then OpenBSD (as one example) had some legendary and epic explosions among its devs and users, but the BSDs all seem to get along now.

    I also agree with your comment elsewhere: IBM’s move away from “Big Endian” Power architecture to “Little Endian” is unfortunately affecting existing efforts. “Bi-Endian”, “Middle-Endian”, etc., are all still out there (but rare and specialised). ARM chips, I think, support both (“Bi”).

    Keep up the good work!

    Like

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